Workers' Compensation FAQ

Many critical questions will naturally come up after a workplace injury. "How will I live without my usual income?" is a typical urgent question from an injured worker, coming right after, "Will I recover?" A consultation with a workers' compensation attorney can provide immediate reassurance and practical help after an injury on the job.

"Knowledge is power," as they say, and I will gladly share knowledge pertaining to your Mississippi workers' compensation claim. Contact me, lawyer Gene Barton, to learn how I can help. I have been practicing law in the Tupelo area for more than 40 years and I will gladly listen to your questions. My goal is to provide the answers and help you need.

Perhaps you are wondering about some of the following topics. What other questions do you have? Note: These answers are general and may not apply in your case.

Is workers' compensation a type of welfare?

Simply put, no. If you were injured on the job and qualify for workers' compensation, it is precisely because your employer has been paying workers' comp insurance premiums in your name as required by law. (Some employers may self-insure). Your eligibility is a direct result of your hard work when you were healthy. Applying for and receiving workers' compensation benefits is similar to making an injury claim after a car accident. You have paid in, you are injured and now it is your turn to receive benefits.

How long must I have worked to qualify for workers' compensation?

Beginning on the first day of your employment, you already qualify for workers' compensation if your employer is legally required to participate. There is no wait time to qualify. Contact a workers' compensation attorney for advice whether you were injured on the first day of work, your last day of work or anytime during your employment.

What must I do to tap into workers' compensation benefits?

The first step is critical: Report your injury to your employer as soon as possible. If it is a sudden traumatic injury on the job, such as a broken bone or a fall injury, this may seem obvious. But this is also important in the case of injuries that are not as noticeable. You should tell your boss or the human relations department at your company as soon as you have a diagnosis or know about a repetitive stress injury (such as carpal tunnel syndrome) or an occupational disease (such as a herniated disk or a lung ailment related to your work activities). Keep records of your communications with your employer in case you need this documentation later.

What if my employer is too small or otherwise not required to pay into workers' compensation insurance for me?

You may have heard or have reason to believe that your employer does not participate in workers' compensation and is not required by law to do so. Regardless, please consult with a lawyer after a workplace injury. There may be ways to get compensation that you are not aware of.

I am Tupelo area attorney Gene Barton and I can help you review all available sources of compensation after you have been hurt on the job — including workers' compensation. Your employer may have participated in the workers' compensation system without sharing that information with you. Or there may be a third-party liability claim against someone other than your employer. As an experienced personal injury lawyer, I am well-prepared to help you file an injury claim or lawsuit.

Bring Your Own List Of Workers' Comp FAQ To My Attention ~ Contact Me, Mississippi Lawyer Gene Barton

Get answers to questions related to your own situation after a workplace injury in Mississippi. Call 662-260-6646 or email me through this website to schedule a free consultation. You will soon learn why people refer to me as the attorney who truly cares. If your workers' compensation case involves disputes with your employer or a workers' compensation insurance carrier, you will also soon learn why people call me "the bulldog of Mississippi." If I am the attorney on your side, I will not rest until you receive the benefits you are eligible for.